This week in drug discovery (6-10 May) 

News round-up for 6-10 May by DDW Multimedia Editor Megan Thomas.

A leading news story this week has been the announcement of positive Phase II results of a head and neck cancer trial, but there have been a number of other interesting clinical result announcements. These include the discovery of molecular doorways that could be used to help deliver drugs into the brain to treat neurological disorders, a plant-based medication which may be an effective therapy to help patients stop vaping, immune B cells which could be used to develop cancer targeting immunotherapies, and positive top-line results in Phase II/III study in schizophrenia patients.

The top stories:

Positive results of Phase II head and neck cancer trial

Calliditas Therapeutics has announced data from the proof-of-concept Phase II trial evaluating setanaxib, its lead NOX enzyme inhibitor, in combination with pembrolizumab, in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).

Nutrient research reveals pathway for treating brain disorders

Dr Rosemary Cater, a University of Queensland (UQ) researcher, has found molecular doorways that could be used to help deliver drugs into the brain to treat neurological disorders.

Plant-based drug can help people quit vaping, study shows

A plant-based medication called cytisinicline may be an effective therapy to help them stop vaping, according to the ORCA-V1 trial results in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine.  

Immune cells research could lead to personalised cancer treatments

Immune B cells could be used to develop cancer targeting immunotherapies, following new research by scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, the University of Oxford and University of Cambridge.

Phase II/III study in schizophrenia patients show positive top-line results

Newron Pharmaceuticals has announced positive top-line results from its potentially pivotal study 008A, evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of evenamide (30mg bid) in patients with chronic schizophrenia currently being treated with a second-generation antipsychotic including clozapine, but demonstrating an inadequate response to that treatment.

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