Survey finds three in ten Americans unwilling to have COVID vaccine

Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine, a study finds. But researchers say there are concerning gaps in interest, particularly among Black Americans, who suffer disproportionately from the virus.

Researchers from The Ohio State University surveyed more than 2,000 Americans, asking them about their willingness to be vaccinated and 11 factors that could influence that decision. They found that 1,374 out of 2006 people in the survey, 69%, said they would “definitely” or “probably” get a vaccine. The survey found that 17% were “not sure” and 14% were “probably or “definitely” not willing.

The study, one of the first estimates of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance in the US appears online in the journal Vaccine.

Lead researcher Paul Reiter, an associate professor of health behaviour and health promotion, said he suspected there would be higher-than-normal interest in this vaccine, considering the nature of the pandemic and the severity of illness many people have experienced.

“The interest here is higher than what we typically see for flu vaccine and other vaccines where there is a strong public health need for widespread protection,” he said.

 

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