Therapeutics
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Targeting tau for Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. Fall 2012 By Dr Eliot J. Davidowitz and Dr James G. Moe Fall 2012
There is no effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) even though the prevalence of this neurodegenerative disorder and its associated costs are growing along with an ageing population. This article discusses whether tau could become a target for the development of disease modifying therapeutics for Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative disorders.

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T cell epitope identification by mass spectrometry: the future in detail. Winter 12 By Dr Nikolai Schwabe and Katherine Catchpole Winter 2012/13
T cells play a crucial role in building a specialised immune response and help adapt the immune response to different challenges, whether they are intracellular bacteria, viruses or cancer or extracellular organisms such as blood-borne bacteria and parasites.

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Induced pluripotent stem cells in high-throughput cellular screening. Winter 12 By Dr Carolyn E. Peluso Winter 2012/13
With the failure rates of drug candidates continuing to present phenomenal costs to the pharmaceutical industry, this article discusses how newly emerging induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies have the potential to be an effective tool in weeding out low quality candidates early in the process, reducing attrition costs and, ultimately, improving the percentage of new drugs to market.

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Challenges and opportunities in the treatment of rare diseases. Spring 13 By Dr Philip J. Vickers Spring 2013
There are approximately 7,000 rare diseases, which from a regulatory perspective are defined as those diseases where there are less than 200,000 patients in the US or that affect no more than five in 10,000 of the general population in the EU.

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Stem Cells rapidly gaining traction in research and drug discovery. Summer 13 By Dr John Comley Summer 2013
A recent market survey on stem cells in research and drug discovery showed that despite a significant amount of hype and hope around stem cells, most drug discovery-related efforts today still fall into the category of basic research and the majority of that was directed towards the oncology/cancer disease area. Human-derived stem cells were of greatest interest and the full range of stem cell types were under investigation, with no single stem cell type predominating.

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Evolving strategies for application-specific validation of research use antibodies. Fall 13 By Dr Alejandra Solache, Robert Brockett, Trinette Chuang, Dr Robin Clark, Rey Dimagiba, Dr April Fisher, Dr Wayne Speckmann and Dr Chun Yang Fall 2013
Antibodies have become a vital tool among researchers in the life sciences and are routinely being used in a number of diverse immunoassay applications, including Western blotting (WB), immunoprecipitation (IP), flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) and immunohistochemistry (IHC).

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Exploring the feasibility of human antimicrobial peptides for new and more efficient antibiotics. Winter 13 By Dr Max Ryadnov Winter 2013
To help combat decades of stagnation in antibiotic development, a team led by the National Physical Laboratory conducted two studies into the antimicrobial peptides that fight infection in our bodies and the feasibility of using them as the basis for new antibiotic treatment which is less prone to bacterial resistance.

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Large-scale expansion of stem cells for therapy and screening. Winter 13 By Dr Y. John Shyu, Dr Katherine E. Strathearn and Dr Richard M. Eglen Winter 2013
Recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies of stem cells in regenerative medicine have demonstrated great promise as treatments for various diseases. Their ability to self-renew and differentiate makes stem cells valuable for both cell therapy and tissue engineering fields, both of which drive the demand for largescale cell expansion.

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Resetting the course of drug development: stem cell banking in support of drug discovery. Winter 13 By Dr Thomas J Novak, Dr Uta Grieshammer, Dr Michael Yaffe and Dr Steve Madore Winter 2013
The discovery by Yamanaka and Thomson in 2007 that human somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state (ie, induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs) has revolutionised cell biology.

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Developing the first treatment for Acute Kidney Injury. By Tim Knotnerus Spring 2014
Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a devastating disease characterised by a rapid loss of kidney function resulting in inability to maintain fluid, electrolyte and acidbase balance. AKI is particularly common in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit where incidence rates between 22% to as high as 67% of admissions have been reported.

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Long live peptides evolution of peptide half-life extension technologies and emerging hybrid approaches. By Dr Ronald V. Swanson Spring 2014
Among therapeutic modalities, peptides occupy a middle ground between traditional ‘small molecule’ drugs and the larger injectable biologics, not fitting comfortably into either category.

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Best practices in Biobanking. By Kiara W. Biagioni Summer 2014
Biobanks or biorepositories are facilities that collect, process, store and distribute biospecimens and associated data, mainly for biological and medical research. They constitute a crucial resource, supporting cutting-edge investigation in fields such as oncology, genomics and personalised medicine, and the development of diagnostics and therapeutics.

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Cellular raw material collection in cell therapy: critical determinant of product quality. By Dr Scott R. Burger, Louis Juliano, and Dr Wenshi Wang Summer 2014
For more than two decades, the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries have been working to unlock the great potential of cell therapy, which uses products composed of living, functional cells to mediate the therapeutic effect.

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Immunotherapeutics: the coming of age of cancer immunotherapy as a treatment paradigm. By Dr Jean Pierre Wery Winter 2014
As the oncology drug development landscape has evolved, so too have the processes, methods and equipment used in the fight against cancer. Traditional treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy are still very popular and remain effective methods of fighting the disease as a whole.

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Adoptive T-Cell Therapies: unlocking the potential of engineered antigen receptors. By Dr Cenk Sumen, Dr Dan Williams and Dr Gwendolyn Binder-Scholl Spring 2015
T-cells with engineered receptors to target tumours represent living drugs with enormous potential in the fight against cancer, but many challenges remain to be overcome in order for their full potential to be achieved.

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Experimental therapeutics for celiac disease and refractory celiac disease. By Dr Francisco Leon and Beth Llewellyn Spring 2015
Celiac disease is a permanent immunological intolerance to gluten proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. In celiac patients, gluten causes a systemic autoimmune disease which starts in the small intestine but spreads to other organs in approximately one half of patients.

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Therapeutics
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