Summer 2002
Page 1 to 9 of 9 |
High throughput genomics and drug discovery – parallel universes or a continuum? By Dr Mark Beggs and Audrey Long Summer 2002
HTS has been in place for approximately 10-12 years and has achieved a threeorder of magnitude scale up. Genomics has been in a ‘high throughput’ mode for approximately four years for areas such as genotyping, is an emerging field governed by sporadic technology leaps and data generation leaps. However, despite these approaches, there are many discrepancies and parallels that exist between the two areas: sample management/assay assembly/parallel processing/ data analysis. However, some differences exist with respect to regulatory issues, public perception and ethical consent. The article will compare and contrast these fields and highlight where both disciplines may learn from each other

Read More

SNP genotyping in drug development By Dr Nicholas C. Dracopoli and Dr Kim E. Zerba Summer 2002
SNP-based candidate gene analyses are likely to have a significant impact on predicting drug efficacy and will, undoubtedly, impact on the pharmaceutical industry’s development strategies as a whole over the next few years.

Read More

NANOLITRE DISPENSING – on the point of delivery By Dr John Comley Summer 2002
Precise low-volume liquid handling methodologies are still sought after by those interested in enabling miniaturised HTS. This article reviews the need for nanolitre dispensing and provides a current perspective on those emerging technologies that have the potential to deliver in the short term. It is clear that the future lies in non-contact methods of droplet ejection.

Read More

Monoclonal antibodies magic bullets or a shot in the dark By Dr Fiona Adair Summer 2002
It has been 16 years since the first monoclonal antibody was approved for therapy in acute transplant rejection. Now, with a further nine therapeutic monoclonal antibodies approved for use and some 16 in phase III trials or beyond, are we still grappling with the same old issues or are magic bullets finally hitting the mark?

Read More

High throughput genomics and drug discovery – parallel universes or a continuum? By Dr Mark Beggs and Audrey Long Summer 2002
HTS has been in place for approximately 10-12 years and has achieved a threeorder of magnitude scale up. Genomics has been in a ‘high throughput’ mode for approximately four years for areas such as genotyping, is an emerging field governed by sporadic technology leaps and data generation leaps. However, despite these approaches, there are many discrepancies and parallels that exist between the two areas: sample management/assay assembly/parallel processing/ data analysis. However, some differences exist with respect to regulatory issues, public perception and ethical consent. The article will compare and contrast these fields and highlight where both disciplines may learn from each other.

Read More

Fine-tuning the technology strategies for lead finding By Sandra Fox, Dr Shauna Farr-Jones, Dr Lynne Sopchak and Dr Helen Wang Summer 2002
HTS has become the workhorse of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies’ drug discovery efforts, with expanding responsibilities and increasing pressures to screen more targets with better compound libraries to find high-quality leads.

Read More

Drug development for skin diseases based on functional genomics By Dr Jörn-Peter Halle Summer 2002
With the high number of sufferers from skin disease around the world, it is astonishing that there are relatively few treatments available and that many of these only serve to relieve symptoms. Can drug development based on a functional genomics approach be the answer in bringing new products to this ‘Cinderella’ market?

Read More

BIOTECHNOLOGY, BIOTERRORISM + BIOSECURITY By Dr George Poste Summer 2002
Advances in genetics and biotechnology offer great promise in the fight against infectious diseases. But the same technologies will also increase the threat from bioterrorism. Governments must accord ‘biosecurity’ a higher priority in defence and foreign policies to reduce the risk of major societal disruptions and international political instabilities caused by infectious diseases, whether of natural or malignant origins. Longer term, technological progress will expand the biothreat spectrum beyond microbial attacks to embrace diverse manipulations of key body functions, including cognition. Meeting these challenges will require profound changes in national security policy, military doctrine, intelligence acquisition and law enforcement, a renewed focus on public health and disease surveillance, the evolution of new private-public partnerships to produce new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines and improved international co-operation to outlaw biological weapons.

Read More

Benchmarking chemistry functions within pharmaceutical drug discovery and preclinical development By Dr Roger A. Edwards, Dr Kai Zhang and Louise Firth Summer 2002
Different companies have employed various techniques and strategies for addressing productivity issues in the chemistry functions within pharmaceutical discovery and preclinical development. We benchmarked lead optimisation, clinical candidate selection, and chemistry support for preclinical development before IND filing in nine major pharmaceutical companies. Results from the benchmarking analyses of strategies, processes, resources and organisational structures in the chemistry functions are presented and discussed in terms of their implications for improving delivery of chemistry capabilities in early drug discovery.

Read More

Summer 2002
Page 1 to 9 of 9 |