Summer 2000
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using expression databases for drug discovery By Dr Greg Lennon Summer 2000
Reference databases are being built cataloguing the amount of RNA each gene makes under different conditions and in different individuals. These databases can be mined easily and effectively to aid the drug discovery process.

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target discovery and drug design: extracting the value from genomics By Professor Ken Powell, Deputy Director, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research Summer 2000
Pharmaceutical research and development is changing. The old model of drug discovery, based on a combination of imprecise candidate generation and broad physiological screens, has given way to more specific and intelligent approaches to target identification and drug design. Now, a vast influx of genomic information is set to revolutionise the range of targets available, at least to those able to navigate effectively through the bewildering immensity of the world’s genomic data archives.

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plants as a source of new medicines By Jennie Gwynn and Peter J Hylands Summer 2000
Putting aside the excitement surrounding the human genome, in the near future we may well start to see the emergence of a new class of prescription medicine containing complex mixtures of plant extracts. This article discusses the important role that plants can play in the search for new medicines and effective therapies.

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HTS a strategy for drug discovery By Dr AR Knight, Cerebrus Ltd Summer 2000
Whichever technologies are implemented, high throughput screening is set to become one of the cornerstones of drug discovery, however deciding which strategy to implement will provide many headaches. This article concentrates on screens identifying the interaction of small molecules with protein targets rather than target identification screens.

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gene function via th analysis of multi-pro By Matthias Mann, Protein Interaction Laboratory (PIL), University of Southern Denmark Summer 2000
Affinity proteomic methods can translate genomic data into validated targets for drug discovery. Baits such as tagged gene product or small molecules obtained from cell-based assays are used to purify interacting proteins. These proteins are then identified by high sensitivity, high throughput mass spectrometric techniques. Successful examples of this novel method are discussed in this article, such as the discovery of key components of the prototypical NF-B inflammation pathway, which are now in drug screening programs.

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emerging therapeutic vaccines By Marc Hertz, Søren Mouritsen and Anand Gautam Summer 2000
The excitement over the past 30 years for immunotherapy of cancer and other diseases has not led to the expected clinical successes. Over-enthusiasts predicted a cure for cancer with the initial development of monoclonal antibody technology, and later the ‘magic bullets’ or toxin-labelled antibodies. Identification of proteins restricted to, or at least overexpressed in tumours has also led to disappointing clinical results. The main barriers have been a lack of immunological understanding of the processes at work, eg immune tolerance. Advances in our understanding of how to induce strong immune responses and how to manipulate the immune system to avoid immunological tolerance have opened the way for emerging therapeutic vaccinations in the treatment of not only cancer, but other diseases as well. This review will focus on immunotherapy for cancer and chronic human diseases characterised by the altered expression of self-proteins.

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recent developments in combinatorial chemistry By Dr Anthony D Baxter Summer 2000
Combinatorial chemistry has advanced significantly from the early 1990s when it was a new science of mainly conceptual interest to today where it has evolved into a key component of the drug discovery industry. The needs of the Pharma industry have demanded that compound libraries produced by the techniques embraced by this technology are of significantly higher quality and ‘value’. This article describes where recent advances have been made in this area from a service company perspective and how these have impacted on the increasing importance and indeed reliance of compound libraries to identify new chemical entities for the pharmaceutical industry.

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Summer 2000
Page 1 to 8 of 8 |