Spring 2002
Page 1 to 7 of 7 |
OBESITY the 21st century disease By Diane L. McBay and Dr Colin T. Dourish Spring 2002
Obesity will be the leading cause of death and disability in the 21st century. This epidemic is largely attributable to increasingly sedentary lifestyles and the abundance of tasty, high-fat foods. Obesity increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, hypertension, osteoarthritis and some forms of cancer.To date, the success of prescription medicines for obesity has been limited.This article discusses the current approaches by the pharmaceutical industry in the search for blockbuster fat-busting drugs.

Read More

Lead generation and lead optimisation: the value of linking HT co-structure analysis and HT chemistry By Dr David U’Prichard Spring 2002
The coupling of High Throughput co-structure analysis with focused library generation is not only proving a powerful general tool in lead optimisation but also increasing the probability of successful discovery of high quality oral development compounds for targets that have been quite difficult for the pharmaceutical industry.

Read More

Key R&D informatics challenges facing small/medium-sized pharmaceutical and biotech companies By John Wise Spring 2002
The ability of R&D informatics to deliver real benefit to the SME pharmaceutical company is constrained by the increasing burden of non-discretionary computer systems combined with the lack of opportunity to leverage the economies of scale enjoyed by the large pharmaceutical companies. Furthermore, the relationship between R&D informatics and the corporate IT department still continues to display some elements of misunderstanding.This paper attempts to identify an alternative way such that SMEs might gain the advantages of economies of scale and enjoy the benefits of working with customer-facing organisations by exploiting the increasingly rich offerings available from ASP-based solutions providers.

Read More

chemical microarrays the drug discovery superhighway By Elaine Seeskin Spring 2002
While producing targets was once the bottleneck in the drug discovery process, in the post-genomic era this has been superseded by the requirement for high-quality lead structures. As a result of the pool of genomic data and countless unvalidated targets now available, researchers are finding that combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening (HTS) against compound libraries are no longer the most cost-effective and time-saving approaches to lead identification. Chemical microarrays, a new type of chip technology, provide a shortcut in the drug discovery process by bypassing conventional target validation, resulting in faster and more efficient research of the interactions of targets with small molecules.

Read More

CHANNELLING DRUG DISCOVERY current trends in ion channel drug discovery research By Dr David Owen and Andrew Silverthorne Spring 2002
Ion channels are proteins that span cell membranes thus forming conduits or ‘channels’ through which charged ions such as sodium and potassium can pass across a normally impermeant barrier such as the plasmalemma. By so doing, ion channels can mediate a wide variety of physiological functions from the generation of action potentials in nerve cells to immune cell function and more.

Read More

Business strategy for implementation of biomarkers in drug development By Miles Flamenbaum Spring 2002
With pharmacoproteomic biomarkers being the subject of focus among regulatory agencies as well as research institutions, many pharmaceutical companies are increasing their interest and investment in biomarker strategies. This article discusses the potential for new efficiencies and cost savings that can be achieved from the utilisation of biomarkers at different stages along the drug development pathway.

Read More

Attacking the SUPERBUGS By Dr Mark L. Nelson Spring 2002
Less than a hundred years ago, if you developed a microbial infection your immune system couldnt handle, you died.Then came the wonder drugs, antibiotics capable of fighting the infections for you. But times have changed. Now, because of antibiotics, their use and misuse, the rise of the Superbugs is upon us, threatening our once potent arsenal of antibiotics, rendering them useless and impotent against a variety of re-emerging microbes. Now the only wonder comes from your physician, whether an antibiotic prescribed works at all.

Read More

Spring 2002
Page 1 to 7 of 7 |