RESULTS FOR : 'Partnering'
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Filling the drug discovery abyss - novel business models to push through the valley of death

Over the past three years, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) have approved around 200 novel drugs for human use (1,2). Not a large number considering the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) citation that for every 5,000 to 10,000 compounds that enter the pipeline, only one receives approval (3)

The benefits of not competing.

Pre-competitive collaboration allows a group of competing companies to come together to develop a solution for a problem that they all share, and from which none of them would gain a competitive advantage.

Brothers in Arms: BioPharma and CROs collaborating in early drug discovery.

BioPharma and CROs are riding the latest wave – discovery research – together with a vigour and gusto that might have seemed implausible five years ago. How these collaborations are structured, and how well they function, can vary widely, though.

Partnering with the right CRO is a winning strategy for companies big and small.

The Bio-Pharma business model is undergoing radical changes. Over the last two decades, we have seen a number of changes as the biopharmaceutical industry has gradually become more willing to look externally and embrace the concept of outsourcing as it looks for new sources of discovery and innovation.

Academic ingenuity and corporate partnerships: new models in human health ventures bring value to all. Summer 13

Many disapprove of science faculty at American universities procuring corporate ventures that support research, instead of primarily functioning as an instructor, mentor and basic researcher. This perception is most evident surrounding biomedical research at public universities. In addition, some object that corporate-funded projects involve student research. In contrast, harmony and accord with companies has been a staple at institutions with medical, engineering or technology within their venerable names.