Screening
This section features DDW articles around screening in drug discovery
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Automating flow cytometry for cell-based screening in drug discovery By Paul Avery & Richard Massey
Flow cytometry is a powerful tool for cell quantitation and analysis across a wide range of clinical and research applications.

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Phenotypic Screening - Advancing the science from discovery to regulatory science By Dr Ellen L. Berg Fall 2017
Phenotypic screening is transforming drug discovery as advances are made in development of human-based physiologically-relevant in vitro systems.

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Novel drug targets from phenotypic screening By Dr Jim Freeth, Dr Elizabeth Kingsley & Jo Soden Fall 2017
Identifying functional molecules with the potential to be developed into new therapeutics is often the sole aim of phenotypic drug discovery.

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Latest developments in high content screening systems. By Dr John Comley Summer2016
High-content screening (HCS) is a well-established approach for the multiparametric analysis of cellular events. Since its first introduction more than a decade ago, HCS imaging systems have continually evolved with many improvements enabled to meet user demands of greater flexibility and the growing requirements of assays involving complex cellular disease models.

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Phenotypic Drug Discovery: striving towards the highest level of biological relevance. By Dr John Comley Winter 2015/16
Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) implies screening where the molecular mechanism of action is not assumed and does not require knowledge of the molecular target.

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High Throughput Flow: a high content platform for phenotypic screening? Dr John Comley Spring 2015
Flow cytometry has many of the technology attributes (eg multi-parameter analysis of cell suspensions) needed when attempting to profile a phenotypic drug response. However, for flow cytometry to be considered the phenotypic drug screening platform of choice it needs to interface with the real screening world, ie be able to support higher throughput and to acquire low sample volumes from high density microplates.

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Redesigning therapeutic drug monitoring for the 21st century. By Lewis Couchman Winter 2014
Therapeutic drug monitoring services are a vital part of the pathology laboratory’s remit, providing essential clinical information to guide the management and treatment of a wide range of patients, from those with psychiatric disorders to post-transplantation care.

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Immunoassay Automation: hands-free platforms set to change the workflow in research labs. By Dr John Comley Winter 2014
The automation of immunoassays is not a new trend, but one that has already witnessed decades of innovation in diagnostic laboratories. However, in terms of hands-free automated processing of small batches of immunoassays in the research lab, the potential end-user is fortunate to be presented today with an increasing number of choices.

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Opportunities for phenotypic screening in drug discovery. By David C. Swinney Fall 14
Renewed awareness of the value of phenotypic screening to drug discovery1-5 creates many new opportunities to increase drug discovery success and productivity. These opportunities include identification of translational phenotypic biomarkers, development of new assays that translate to human disease and refinement of paradigms to successfully execute phenotypic drug discovery (PDD).

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Industrial-scale screening accelerates discovery of novel drug combination therapies. By Dr Oliver Leven and Dr Eric Tang Fall 14
Drug combination therapies are widely recognised as essential therapeutic treatments for chronic conditions ranging from infectious diseases to cancer and HIV/AIDS. Such therapies can enhance a clinical efficacy profile, improve the therapeutic window by reducing the effective clinical dosage and possibly delay the onset of acquired drug resistance.

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The current status of non-biopharma drug discovery. By Dr John Comley Spring 2014
Screening centres in academic institutions and non-profit organisations have, over the past decade, become an established mechanism to exploit novel targets and neglected diseases and to identify chemical probes. Where centres have a disease focus, their main expertise resides in cancer and phenotypic screens, with screening experience greatest for kinases, phenotypic approaches and protein-protein interactions.

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Fluorescence Lifetime Assays. By Dr Graham Cotton, Dr Wayne Bowen, Dr Robert Grundy and Dr Ulrich Hassiepen Fall 13
The benefits of fluorescence lifetime (FLT)-based technologies have been
highlighted for more than a decade but thus far they have failed to gain
widespread acceptance. Significant improvements in assay reagents and availability of HTS-compatible readers, however, have now delivered a cost-effective, robust technology applicable to a broad range of therapeutic targets. This article charts FLT development to be a highly attractive tool for drug discovery.

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Outsourced Kinase Profiling Services: adding value to in-house kinase programmes. Dr John Comley
Biochemical kinase profiling using a large panel of kinases with a broad coverage of the human kinome has become the de facto norm within the Pharma industry. The importance of this activity is demonstrated by the large number of service providers offering outsourced kinase profiling services.

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A decade of RNAi screening: too much hay and very few needles. By Bhavneet Bhinder and Dr Hakim Djaballah Summer 2013
RNAi screening is arguably the fastest growing field with the premise to better understand gene function at the genome level. It has been hailed as the second genomics wave, and in combination with the human genome-sequencing projects, would constitute the holy grail of modern genetics.

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Screening
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