Drug Discovery
Page 14 to 28 of 57 |   < PREVIOUS PAGE   NEXT PAGE >
Therapeutic Drug Repurposing, Repositioning and Rescue Part III market exclusivity using Intellectual Property and regulatory pathways. By Dr Stephen Naylor, David M. Kauppi and Judge M. Schonfeld Summer 2015
There is a growing consensus that Drug Repurposing, Repositioning and Rescue (DRPx) can impact the prescription drug industry for all concerned stakeholders. In part this is due to the fact that the pharmaceutical industry now accrues ~25% of its annual revenues from DRPx products.

Read More

When two are not enough: lead optimisation beyond matched pairs. By Dr Noel M. O'Boyle, Dr Roger A. Sayle and Dr Matt Segall Fall 2015
Lead optimisation projects progress by making successive enhancements to one or more starting structures. This is a classic multi-objective optimisation procedure where the goal is not only to improve potency but also to improve physicochemical and ADME properties.

Read More

Progress in the implementation of Label-Free Dectetion - part 1: cell-based assays by Dr John Comley Fall 2008
Overall it remains unclear whether label-free will break into main stream cell-based lead discovery or will mostly fill the gaps that other technologies do less well?

Read More

Natural product pharmaceuticals - the third generation By Dr Melanie McCullagh Winter 2008
Compounds derived from natural products have made a big impact on the pharmaceutical industry. Of the 1,010 NCEs approved between January 1981 and June 2006, 43 were unaltered natural products (NPs) and a further 232 (23%) were second generation NP derivatives1.

Read More

Growing Interest in Outsourcing Ion Channel Services By Dr John Comley Summer 2008
Significant demand now exists in Pharma and Biotech to access ion channel testing services and this is reflected by the number and the variety of service offerings.

Read More

Challenges in transferring bioanalytical methods. By Dr Chris Beaver Fall 2008
Drug development is arduous and expensive with any delay to market resulting in significant financial impact. Delays at any stage of the process cause challenges to programmes, however, some are easier to predict and plan for than others.

Read More

The role of Thorough QT testing in managing drug development. By Dr William S. Wheeler Winter 2007
With few exceptions, all compounds being submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval in the United States will require an assessment of QT prolongation, either by a standard Thorough QT/QTc study, or a similar study modified to fit the safety profile of the compound and indicated patient population.

Read More

Perspectives for ADME/Tox Integration in the Discovery Process; Winter 07 By Dr Constance H�fer Winter 07
ADME/T is a relatively new symbiotic acronym for the investigation of basic compound behaviour in terms of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, combined with assessments of toxicity.

Read More

Predicting Transporter-mediated Drug-drug Interactions Based on in Vitro Cell Permeability Assays By Dr Chris Bode Spring 2009
Drugs may fail in clinical development or post-marketing for a variety of reasons: they may simply not be as effective as anticipated; poor pharmacokinetic properties may prevent them from reaching their intended target in therapeutic doses; or they are proven unsafe.

Read More

Dispense and Imaging Assays. By Dr John Comley Spring 08
Progress towards the uptake and adoption of flash luminescence readouts in screening were the subject of HTStec's recent Dispense & Imaging (D&I) Trends 2007 report. The report suggests that the transition process may be less of a displacement of fluorescence with flash luminescence, but rather a wider more balanced implementation of both readouts.

Read More

Where the (drug) action really is; progress in systems-based analysis of Cellular Signalling. By Dr Jeffrey A. Radding Spring 08
Drug discovery currently focuses on targeted approaches, relying on validation of the target as a disease driver. However, the underlying biological complexity of disease often frustrates these attempts at therapeutic intervention, resulting in high failure rates due to lack of efficacy.

Read More

Deja vu all over again: emerging concepts of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) function and drug discovery; Winter 06 By Dr Richard M. Eglen, Dr Roger Boss� and Dr Graham S. Long; Winter 06 Winter 2006
G protein-coupled cell surface receptors (GPCRs) have served a fundamental role in modern pharmacology, due to their central importance in cell communication, and have been the target for the discovery of a large number of drugs. By one estimate, more than 40% of marketed drugs target GPCRs.

Read More

The Role of Microarray Technology By Richard Fisler Winter 2006/7
The expectation that microarray technology will play a large role in shaping the future of pharmaceutical development and diagnostics has greatly increased due to new products and applications. Microarrays for gene expression have made a profound impact in the pharmaceutical and biomedical worlds.

Read More

Ultra-sensitive measurement of protein and nucleic acid biomarkers may enable earlier disease detection and more effective therapies : Winter 06 By Dr Gregory Shipp Winter 2006
The pharmaceutical industry is striving to develop effective new therapies for diseases, ranging from cancers to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders to a host of metabolic, infectious and genetic conditions, and is placing emphasis on treatments related to the early detection of disease.

Read More

Drug Discovery
Page 14 to 28 of 57 |   < PREVIOUS PAGE   NEXT PAGE >