Business
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Technology, Bane or Bonanza for the Pharmaceutical industry? Fall 07 By Dr Stephen Naylor, Adam W. Culbertson and Dr Stephen J. Valentine Fall 2007
Productivity in the pharmaceutical industry has long held well-documented concerns. While the adoption of new technologies into the drug discovery and development process has often been seen as a panacea this article argues that, without a true understanding of the complexities of introducing new technologies into the workplace and the ability to interpret the complex and massive data sets that are produced, then how can we expect it to be the bonanza to the pharmaceutical industry and the cure for all its woes?

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Living in hard times. Winter 08 By Paul Branthwaite Winter 2008
Maintaining knowledge and experience internally is a challenge in today's financial climate, in SMEs and in big pharma. This article provides some tips on how companies can maintain their best staff or find reliable alternative options, especially at the critical level, when downsizing is inevitable or 'class acts' are unavailable

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The Deming Approach to Quality. Fall 07 By John H. Van Drie Fall 2007
We explore the relevance to pharmaceutical research of the ideas of W. Edwards Deming, the statistician whose ideas on quality transformed the manufacturing sector of post-war Japan.

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Implementing and Operating Large Complex Capital Projects in a Research Environment. Winter 06 By Dr Tim Peakman Winter 2006
UK Biobank is a major UK study that will recruit 500,000 volunteers aged between 40 and 69 to provide a resource to study the link between genetic factors, environment and lifestyle in the causes of health and disease.

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Repositionings Role in Drug Discovery and Development. Winter 06 By Dr Louis A. Tartaglia and Dr Lee E. Babiss Winter 2006
The large number of drug candidate failures in recent years has been enormously costly for the pharmaceutical industry, but has also created the tremendous opportunity of repositioning these molecules into new disease areas.

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Building Innovative Partnerships in Neglected Disease Research. Winter 06 By Prof Paul Herrling Winter 2006
While the recent biomedical revolution has given rise to significant advances in medical treatment, many neglected diseases that are endemic in underdeveloped parts of the world remain unaddressed.

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Lean Six Sigma; its application to drug discovery. Spring 08 By Clare Hammond and Charles J O'Donnell Spring 08
In an increasingly competitive world, the race between pharmas to get high quality candidate drugs to market is on. Contributing to this success is the discovery phase of lead optimisation. The application of Lean and Six Sigma processes have, until now, been theorised to benefit the improvement in the rate at which drugs progress through to development and improve the quality of the clinical candidates1. It is the objective of this communication to demonstrate that this is indeed possible.

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Outsourcing for innovation takes on new meaning. Winter 08 By Richard Boehner Winter 2008
Large pharmaceutical companies are moving quickly to outsource their drug discovery operations, predominantly to lower costs. This article argues that if outsourcing is done to capture value, ie developing and preserving intellectual property as a key competitive differentiation as well as increasing productivity, then costs will fall in line accordingly.

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Prediction v Attrition. Fall 08 By Professor Malcolm Young Fall 2008
A substantial number of very valuable drugs have gone, or are about to go, off patent; too few good new premium drugs are coming through to market.

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The timetable of Invention. Summer 06 By Dr William Bains Summer 2006
The most critical question to any investor in new technology should not be whether a technology will work. Technologies nearly always work in the end, providing they do not break fundamental laws of physics, and are not based on false discoveries to start with (like 'Polywater' and Cold Fusion). Enough time, investment and dedicated science will take almost any idea to realisation in the healthcare market, and if the market is willing to pay the price it will then make a profit.The critical question is: how long will it take?

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Whither Pharma? Summer 06 By Dr Alpheus Bingham Summer 2006
It has been suggested that the blockbuster business model, which has been the key to big pharma success, is now broken and completely beyond repair. In a truly global and fast changing business world, is it time to examine alternatives to the classic monolithic risk structure and evolve into the 'next generation pharma' that many suggest is inevitable if the pharmaceutical industry is to survive?

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Stem Cell patent trends. Fall 06 By Dr Gareth Williams Fall 2006
Stem cell therapies hold great promise for future medical treatment, but in order to realise their potential there must be sufficient investment, private or public, in the technology. A key aspect of obtaining investment in any biotechnology field is the availability of patent protection; conversely, the filing patterns of those companies and other entities which are filing patent applications can give valuable information on the state of the industry.

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The biomedical ecosystem delivering better health and prosperity. Fall 06 By Dr Peter B. Corr Fall 2006
The overall message is simple: biomedical innovation and the public policies and new technologies that sustain and advance innovation are crucial to the future of biomedical science and the health and well being of our society.

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Is the pharmaceutical industry open for innovation? Fall 10 By Dr Jackie Hunter CBE Fall 2010
Open innovation is the hot topic in many industries and this approach has the potential to make a radical difference to the costs of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical industry. But there are also barriers to the industry fully embracing this new way of working and adding it to other models for externalisation.

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The benefits of drug repositioning. Spring 11 By Dr Aris Persidis Spring 11
Drugs in development, on the market, or those that are shelved because of lack of efficacy, are excellent starting points for further development. Finding new indications for such drugs will benefit patients who will see a potential new therapy sooner, will maximise their value and will also protect the original IP owner against competitor adjacency moves. Typically, repositioning is done by accident, or in a limited way. New technologies however, enable the systematic evaluation of any drug or mechanism of action against any disease or adverse event.

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Assessing the value of R&D partnerships. Winter 10 By Dr David A Pardoe, Dr Jackie Hunter MBE, Dr Robert M Cooke and Dr Paul Barrett Winter 2010
In response to the need to increase the return on investment in R&D, many large Pharma companies are shifting from an internal fixed resource model to more flexible, external relationships. These partnerships are diverse, ranging from basic scientific investigations, through establishing new technologies and methods, to the discovery, development and commercialisation of therapeutic agents.

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Business
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